13 Most Valuable Brown Glass Clorox Bottles Worth A Fortune

Glass bottles have been widely used for centuries, and they’re still in use today.

But many of the glass bottles that were produced in the past are now considered collectible items since they’re no longer being made.

Clorox bottles are one such example. Antique bottles are still being dug up today, and their value is highly dependent on the rarity of the bottle.

When it comes to collecting valuable antiques, most people think of delicate porcelain tea sets and rare oil paintings. But when it comes to the world of antique bottles, Clorox bottles might be worth a fortune. The key is finding those rare brown bottles that were produced in the early years of the company.

Trying to collect all these bottles today would take some deep digging and a lot of luck, but if you do find them, you could have a fortune on your hands. Here are 13 ultra-rare most valuable brown glass Clorox bottles worth a fortune.

13 Most Valuable Brown Glass Clorox Bottles Ever Sold

We made a table containing a list of the most valuable brown glass Clorox bottles ever sold, check them out! Yours might just be among the list.

No.
Brown Clorox Bottle
Year
Price
1
Vintage Amber Clorox Bottle
1950s
$45
2
Set of Three Amber Vintage Clorox Glass Bottles
1930s-1950s
$75
3
1/2 Gallon Amber Glass Clorox Jug
1950
$25.80
4
Set of Two Vintage Amber Color Clorox Bottles
1950s
$125
5
Vintage Brown Glass Clorox Bottle
1920s
$14.99
6
Antique Clorox Glass Amber Bottle
1955
$70
7
Antique Clorox Bleach 16oz Amber Glass Bottle
1920s
$66
8
Vintage Brown Empty Clorox Bottle
1920s
$38.99
9
Vintage Clorox Gallon Bottle Jug
1900s
$30
10
Vintage Clorox Embossed Bottle
1930
$32
11
Vintage Clorox Brown Glass 16 oz Bottle
1943
$38
12
Vintage Clorox Brown Glass 16 oz Bottle
1950s
$11.90
13
Vintage Brown Amber Glass Clorox Bottle
1930s
$10

1. Vintage Amber Clorox Bottle

Year: 1950s

Price: $45

1. Vintage Amber Clorox Bottle

Did someone say Clorox bottles? The most valuable models are the ones that are brown and made of glass. These vintage bottles were produced in the 80s and 90s, so there’s a good chance you might have some in your basement or attic.

This vintage amber Clorox bottle is 10 inches tall, 3.5 inches in diameter at the bottom, and has a small brown plastic cap. No chips or cracks. This is a Clorox bottle from around the 1980s. This bottle is a great decor item for your living space. The value is said to increase with time.

2. Set of Three Amber Vintage Clorox Glass Bottles

Year: 1930s-1950s

Price: $75

2. Set of Three Amber Vintage Clorox Glass Bottles

If you have a set of brown Clorox bottles, you can turn them in for sale and get above $50. You are looking at a vintage set of three Clorox amber glass bottles. The two smaller bottles were designed to hold 32 oz, and 16 oz of Clorox. The top front of the largest bottle is embossed with “CLOROX”,”Half Gallon” and “32 oz.” The lower neck and bottom front of this bottle also have the words, “CLOROX” embossed on them.

Each bottle is embossed with the letters CLOROX REG U.S. PAT OFF and the largest bottle has a jug handle for easy carrying. The full-gallon bottle is 10 inches tall, 5 inches around, and has a bakelite cap. All three bottles are worth $75.

3. 1/2 Gallon Amber Glass Clorox Jug

Year: 1950

Price: $25.80

3 Gallon Amber Glass Clorox Jug

Vintage half-gallon Clorox glass jug from the 1950s. In great, used, pre-loved, vintage condition. No chips or cracks. It does have some residue in it and also has some rust on the lid. The glass is clear with no cloudiness. It has the famous Clorox embossed on the body of the bottle. Such a cool vintage piece! Makes for a great addition to your antique collection.

The handle makes it easier to hold the bottle, however, you would only be able to fit about one finger in the hole provided. This Clorox bottle is worth about $25.

4. Set of Two Vintage Amber Color Clorox Bottles

Year: 1950s

Price: $125

4. Set of Two Vintage Amber Color Clorox Bottles

Just before the Clorox company began to switch to plastic bottles, they had initially used glass bottles. Today, these glass bottles were rare and valuable. If you have an old Clorox bottle at home, you might want to think again before throwing it away. It might not fetch you a lot of money, however, as little as $10 is better than throwing it away in the trash.

This listing is for a set of two vintage amber-colored Clorox bottles. One full gallon and one-half gallon. No chips or cracks, just minor water stains on the inside of bottles. These were made in the 1940s and have a great vintage look. I personally find them to be quite beautiful.

5. Vintage Brown Glass Clorox Bottle

Year: 1920s

Price: $14.99

5. Vintage Brown Glass Clorox Bottle

Clorox made bottles of different shapes and sizes, you can clearly see that this particular bottle has a different shape from the ones previously listed above. The neck of the bottle has a resemblance to a beverage bottle. It also comes with a metal stopper that is 100% rustproof.

The current value of this Clorox bottle is $14.99, which makes it totally worthy of being on our list of 15 most valuable brown glass Clorox bottles worth a fortune. The Clorox name is embossed on the neck of the bottle for authentication.

6. Antique Clorox Glass Amber Bottle

Year: 1955

Price: $70

6. Antique Clorox Glass Amber Bottle

The Clorox company had different sizes of bottles produced around 1955, bottles that were bigger in size were given handles to make carrying easier. Feel free to take a good look at this valuable brown glass Clorox bottle, it might be the same as the one you have had laying in your basement for years.

Its current value on eBay is $70. Its capacity is about 154 ounces, which is approximately up to 1 gallon. The cap on the bottle is original and rustproof.

7. Antique Clorox Bleach 16oz Amber Glass Bottle

Year: 1920s

Price: $66

7. Antique Clorox Bleach 16oz Amber Glass Bottle

The neck of the bottle is embossed with Clorox, and the shoulder of the bottle is marked with Clorox in two different size fonts with 16oz marking the capacity of the bottle. The bottom edge of the bottle is also stamped Clorox. The bottom foot of the bottle is marked with Clorox inside a diamond and around it is “Reg. U.S. Pat. Off.”

This bottle would be great for a vintage kitchen collection or display! The bottle measures 8 inches tall and its diameter is 3 inches. The mouth of the bottle is about ½.

8. Vintage Brown Empty Clorox Bottle

Year: 1920s

Price: $38.99

8. Vintage Brown Empty Clorox Bottle

This is a rare and vintage Brown Empty Clorox Purex Bottle that comes with an original cork from the 1900s. This is an old brown glass bottle that is worth about $39. This bottle has the words “Purex” on it to show authenticity. The bottle has no cracks or chips, with the exception of some minor imperfections.

It’s in superb condition for its age and it is very rare. It is tall and not as big as the other bottles previously listed. Clorox company sure did have a lot of bottle sizes produced in the past.

9. Vintage Clorox Gallon Bottle Jug

Year: 1950s

Price: $30

9. Vintage Clorox Gallon Bottle Jug

What’s not to love about the shape of this old Clorox bottle. As you can see, the bottle is shaped like a jug, the company had a couple of these made in the 1900s. If you are thinking that your old Clorox bottle is useless because it has no lid, then think again! This bottle has no lid, however, it is worth $30.

The bottle has a few scratches here and there, but it doesn’t really matter. The value is bound to go higher in the future. The name Clorox can be found on the shoulder and the bottom of the bottle for authenticity.

10. Vintage Clorox Embossed Bottle

Year: 1930

Price: $32

10. Vintage Clorox Embossed Bottle

Antique Clorox 32oz embossed bottle. A very rare collector’s item in the glass world. The word “Clorox” is embossed in script on the upper edge 2 times, on the shoulder 4 times, around the lip 2 times, at the base 5 times, and on the bottom once.

A 32-ounce bottle from the early days of the Clorox Company, featuring their original 1932-33 skinny neck design with the original plug intact, is a stunning amber color. The glass itself measures just under 10 inches tall and 3 1/2 inches wide.

11. Vintage Clorox Brown Glass 16 oz Bottle

Year: 1943

Price: $38

11. Vintage Clorox Brown Glass 16 oz Bottle

This Clorox bottle was made between 1943 and 1943. Earlier bottles had an embossed Clorox stamp in a different location, and later bottles had a grain texture. The bottle is in great shape, it shines beautifully and cleans easily. However, the inside of the bottle is dirty and difficult to wash out. The Clorox bottle measures: 8.25″ tall x 2.75″ in diameter.

Its current value is $38. It has a bakelite Screw Top Cap, it’s rare to find vintage Clorox bottles with such caps.

12. Vintage Embossed Clorox Bottle 32-oz

Year: 1950s

Price: $11.90

12. Vintage Embossed Clorox Bottle 32-oz

This brown bottle has the word Clorox embossed on different locations, it also has a mark on the bottom. It is used but in good condition, with no chips or cracks. This bottle is 9.5 inches high and 3.25 inches across at its widest point.

There’s no cover on the bottle, however, that doesn’t totally affect the value of the bottle. This vintage brown glass Clorox bottle is worth $11.90.

13. Vintage Brown Amber Glass Clorox Bottle

Year: 1930s

Price: $10

13. Vintage Brown Amber Glass Clorox Bottle

Of course, smaller bottles would have lesser value compared to bigger ones. If you have a small Clorox bottle in your possession, it isn’t completely useless. The Clorox bottle amber glass featured here is worth $10. Better than nothing right?

The old vintage bottle is 8 x 3 in and is in great shape. It has no cap, perhaps the value could go up a bit higher if there was a cap on the lid.

The History Of Glass Clorox Bottles

In 1913, Clorox bleach was first manufactured in Oakland, California. At this time, the original 5-gallon crockery containers were used, and the diamond-shaped design and the word “Clorox” in the center of the label were developed by a young artist hired by The Electro-Alkaline Company.

In Oakland’s laundries, breweries, and municipal water companies, Clorox bleach was used primarily in five-gallon containers. These containers were the company’s only form of manufacture until the fifteen-ounce amber glass “pint” containers with rubber stoppers were manufactured to save the company from foreclosure.

A new household version of the product quickly became popular. The company that developed it began supplying other companies with amber glass for packaging a variety of liquid products. So, unless the label is still on the bottle, or the stopper with the Clorox name on it is still attached, one cannot know for sure that it is a Clorox bottle.

  • In 1928, the disinfectant company went public and changed its name to Clorox Chemical Company. From 1929 on, it used a special type of glass bottle with a rubber stopper.
  • Between 1929 and 1930, the Clorox trademark was found on the bottom of the bottle, with “Clorox” printed on the top of the rubber stopper.
  • In 1931, the word “Clorox” was added in solid lettering on the neck and shoulder, and in 1932 its placement was extended to the heel. In 1934, the contents were identified, and four years later a fill line was included.
  • In 1940, an important design change was made to the bottles: The threaded neck appeared, and screw caps replaced rubber stoppers. This design change remained in place for five years. In 1945, a textured surface appeared on the shoulder and heel of the bottle. During this time, the one-gallon container with a finger ring handle was introduced.
  • In 1951, the solid lettering used for 20 years was replaced with outline lettering—the grained texture extended to the label panel, and in 1955, raised fill lines appeared—replacing side content identification.
  • In 1958, the company changed the shape of the bottle caps for both gallon and half-gallon bottles. They removed the grained texture from the side of the label panels, leaving it only on the shoulder and heel.
  • In 1959 the neck area on Clorox jugs became more streamlined and bulb-shaped: Four-fingered gallon and half-gallon jugs came out in 1960, replacing ornate glass models. Conversion to white, polyethylene plastic bottles began in 1960 and completely replaced glass Clorox by 1962.

How To Date Brown Glass Clorox Bottles

Do you see those brown glass Clorox bottles and wonder how old they are or where they came from? I know I do. You can tell how old the bottle is by looking at the bottom and reading the date code on it. Are you stuck if you don’t know how to interpret the date code? No worries, I’ll teach you a quick method on how to date brown glass Clorox bottles by characteristics.

Characteristics
Year
● Solid lettering on neck

● Shoulder and heel

● Rubber stoppers used to seal opening

1932
● Solid lettering on neck

● Shoulder and heel

● Fill line just under ounce identification

● Rubber stoppers used to seal opening

1937
● Solid lettering on neck

● Shoulder and heel

● Fill line just below ounce identification

● Neck area widens to 3-4/16″ around

● Rubber stoppers used to seal opening

1938-1939
● Threaded neck

● Screw-on lid

● Other characteristics same as 1938-1939

1940-1944
● A grained texture added on shoulder and heel

● Fill line above ounce identification

● Other characteristics same as 1940-44

1945-1950
● Outline lettering replaces solid lettering

● Grained texture on shoulder

● Threaded neck

● Heel and extending down label panel

● Fill line does not show ounce identification

1951-1954
● Finger ring handle on one-gallon bottle
1951-1955

The Evolution of Brown Glass Clorox Bottles

The number of people who collect antique bottles is on the rise, and with it the number of valuable bottles that are being discovered. If you’re an avid collector then you know just how exciting it is to find a long-forgotten bottle that’s worth a lot of money. Let’s talk a bit about the evolution of brown glass Clorox bottles;

Cork Top Bottles (1929-1939)

Cork top bottles were the first brown glass Clorox bottles manufactured by the company. Cork top bottles were popular until the 1950s when screw-top bottles took over. There were different adjustments made to cork top bottles over the years. In the year 1939, the company stopped the production of cork top bottles and started producing screw-top bottles. Generally, Cork top bottles were invented in the 19th Century and were popular until the 1950s. They were made from brown glass with a cork stopper and were typically used to store wine, liquor, or sherry.

Cork Top Bottles (1929-1939)

Screw-Top Bottles

In 1940, The Clorox Company replaced the rubber stopper cork tops of its bottles with threaded necks for screw-top caps, which were easier and cheaper to manufacture. Clorox bottles used to have raised, solid lettering. Since 1951 they’ve had bumpy, outlined letters. The company also produced different sizes of bottles including Pint, Quart, and Half Gallon Bottles. Around 1945, 1-gallon bottles started to hit the market. Production of these screw-top bottles started in 1940 and lasted until 1962.

Screw-Top Bottles

1957 Quart

1957 Quart

For years, Clorox tinkered with different kinds of bleach packages. None ever went nationwide because they didn’t live up to Clorox’s exacting packaging standards. The 1957 Quart isn’t something you would find easily. However, if you do it should be worth a lot. I think the 1957 quart was a lovely bottle. It had a handle at the top that could fit at least two fingers.

1960 Half Pint

Over the years, several other styles of Clorox bleach packaging were considered. Each never reached full national distribution because they didn’t meet Clorox’s exacting packaging standards. One of which is the 1960 Half Pint bottle. While there are no bottles that fall outside the range covered in this guide, some were distributed as tests in the test market or as samples. As a result, collectors may occasionally come across a Clorox that is not included in this guide.

1960 Half Pint

Determining The Value Of Brown Glass Clorox Bottles

So you’ve started collecting old bottles, and are wondering what to do with the brown glass Clorox bottles? In the past, these bottles were used for bleach. Now, some of these bottles are quite valuable. I have created a guide that will give you tips on determining the estimated value of brown glass Clorox bottles.

Note: These are estimated values are based on prices of previous items sold on auction websites

Year
Price Range
1932
$30-40
1937
$30-$40
1938-1939
$14-$70
1940-1944
$10-$15
1945-1950
$11-$70
1951-1955
$25-$80

Where Can I Sell My Brown Glass Clorox Bottles Near Me

Clorox bottles have value, especially if the bottles aren’t broken or damaged badly. Even if the cap of your Clorox bottle is missing and you can’t find it, you could still get some money from sales. If you own some Clorox bottles and want to sell them, here are some options to consider;

Flea Markets & Yard Sales

Setting up a table at a flea market or yard sale is an excellent way to get rid of all your Clorox bottles in one shot. You can also add other vintage items, such as books, magazines, and collectibles. This is not a very profitable way to sell your collection but it’s good if you are not looking to get top dollar for each piece and want to sell them fast.

Auctions

You may want to consider an auction for some of your pieces to see what the market will bear for your old bottle. If you are considering this avenue, make sure you do your research and find an auction house that specializes in antiques or vintage items and has experience dealing with vintage Glasses. These auctions typically charge a 20-25% commission fee so make sure you know what that will mean as far as your final sale price goes.

Other places to sell

  1. eBay
  2. Etsy

Last Words

These are the most valuable Clorox bottles to look out for. Collectors will pay top dollar for any of them and more if you have more than one. If you have some vintage Clorox bottles lying around, or you’ve inherited them from your parents or grandparents, now is a good time to check their values. If you have a valuable one, you can try selling it on auction sites like eBay and collectors’ fairs. Who knows? You might just get lucky!

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