20 Rare and Most Valuable Presidential Dollar Coins Ever Sold

In this article, you’ll discover some of the most expensive Presidential Dollar Coins ever sold. Although it was discontinued, there are still plenty of people who collect them. If you’re crazy about coin collecting, you must know about Presidential dollars. In the past few years, the popularity of these coins has increased. Many people believe that these coins are pretty lucky to own.

The value of a Presidential dollar is $1, Old uncirculated coins dating back to 2007-2009 may be worth $2.28.

Ever since the United States Mint released its Presidential Dollars series, there have been a variety of different errors that happened during production. These error coins are some of the most valuable presidential dollars and are almost impossible to find. On our list of rare and most valuable presidential dollar coins, you will discover some of these errors and how much they have sold for in the past.

Table of Contents

20 Rare and Most Valuable Presidential Dollar Coins: List

No
Presidential Coin
Grade
Price Sold
1
2007 George Washington Presidential Dollar: Double Denomination on a Jefferson Nickel
MS64
$17,625
2
2007 John Adams Presidential Dollar: Struck Twice on an Aluminum Feeder Finger Fragment
MS64
$2,300
3
2008 Presidential Dollar John Quincy Adams: Struck on a Nickel Planchet
MS67
$8,812.50
4
Undated (2007-?) Presidential Dollar. George Washington: Feeder Finger Strike
MS66
$6,325
5
(2008-?) Presidential Dollar. Martin Van Buren: Feeder Finger Strike
MS65
 $5,980
6
2007-P Presidential Dollar. George Washington: Double Struck 35% Off Center
MS66
$5,875
7
Undated (2007) Presidential Dollar Thomas Jefferson: Struck 30% Off Center
MS66
$2,937.50
8
2010 Presidential Dollar Franklin Pierce: Broadstruck on Blank, Missing Edge Lettering
MS65
$1,495
9
Undated (2007-P) Presidential Dollar. George Washington: Struck Six Times and Broadstruck, Missing Edge Lettering
MS66
$690
10
Undated (2007-P) Presidential Dollar. John Adams: Overlapped Double Struck and Broadstruck, Missing Edge Lettering
MS64
$368
11
2007 Adams Dollar, Plain Edge: Struck Seven Times, Strikes 3 Through 7 40% Off Center
MS66
$3,120
12
2010 Millard Fillmore Presidential Dollar, Missing Edge Lettering: Clad Layer Missing On Obverse
MS66
$352.50
13
Undated (2007-?) Presidential Dollar John Adams: Triple Struck, 3rd Strike 80% Off Center, Missing Edge Lettering
MS65
$891.25
14
2007 Jefferson Presidential Dollar: Obverse Manganese Layer Missing, Missing Edge Lettering
MS64
$381.38
15
2007 Madison Presidential Dollar: Double Struck on an Aluminum Finger Feeder Tip
MS66
$8,050
16
2007 Washington Presidential Dollar–Multiple Struck, Huge Broadstrike, Missing Edge Lettering
MS64
$920
17
2007 Madison Presidential Dollar: Missing Edge Lettering, Reverse Manganese Layer Missing
MS64
$402
18
2008 $1 Jackson Presidential Dollar: Die Adjustment Strike, Missing Edge Lettering
MS64
$1,380
19
2009-D $1 Polk Presidential Dollar: Die Adjustment Strike
Not Graded
$1,265
20
2007-S $1 Jefferson Presidential Dollar: Struck on an Elliptical Planchet
PR69
$632.50

1. 2007 George Washington Presidential Dollar: Double Denomination on a Jefferson Nickel

Price: $17,625

Grade: MS64

2007 George Washington Presidential Dollar

The value of a 2007-P Presidential Dollar (George Washington variety) in uncirculated (MS+) mint condition is estimated to be worth $2.28 or more. However, various error coins exist and these errors are highly valued most of the time.

The Jefferson nickel under type can be seen below PRESIDENT 1789 and above the torch and OF AM because the dollar strike was slightly off-center toward 12:30. United and George Washington are only partially represented in the finished painting of Washington. Unabraded semi proof like surfaces exhibit faint gold toning.

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2. 2007 John Adams Presidential Dollar: Struck Twice on an Aluminum Feeder Finger Fragment

Price: $2,300

Grade: MS64

2007 John Adams Presidential Dollar

This Presidential Dollar error coin was struck twice on an aluminum feeder finger fragment. The coin is in mint state condition, grading MS64 by PCGS. The location of the production of this Presidential dollar error cannot be determined without edge markings, but the fragmentary inscription 2ND PRES(IDENT) fixes the president as John Adams and the year as 2007.

The reverse of this metal feeder finger piece reveals that the word STATES was struck twice. On average, with no error present, the 2007-P Presidential Dollar (John Adams Variety) is valued at $2.28 or more in uncirculated mint condition.

3. 2008 Presidential Dollar John Quincy Adams: Struck on a Nickel Planchet

Price: $8,812.50

Grade: MS67

2008 Presidential Dollar John Quincy Adams

A fantastic error with a $1 from the President! There are now surprisingly few conspicuous faults leaving the U.S. Mint thanks to years of quality control improvements. Though this inaccuracy has been noted a few times for other varieties of Presidential dollars, the current coin is thought to be unique for the issue.

The coin is extremely frosty, with a stunning shine and aesthetic appeal. The tiny planchet was perfectly placed to display Adams’ entire image as well as just enough of the legend to identify him.

4. Undated (2007-?) Presidential Dollar. George Washington: Feeder Finger Strike

Price: $6,325

Grade: MS66

Presidential Dollar. George Washington

Although this type of inaccuracy was formerly thought to have been caused by the tips of the feeder fingers employed in the current minting process, it is now proven to have originated from metal debris.

The current specimen is beautiful and bright white, with both sides showing the George Washington Presidential Dollar design, which verifies the year of striking as 2007. We are unable to pin this mistake on either the Philadelphia or Denver Mints, as the mintmark area for this coin is also on the edge.

5. (2008-?) Presidential Dollar. Martin Van Buren: Feeder Finger Strike

Price: $5,980

Grade: MS65

Presidential Dollar. Martin Van Buren

The obviously depicts the Martin Van Buren obverse design, however, dates this inaccuracy to 2008. This presidential coin is lacking edge writing, which also leaves out the date and mintmark.

The striking pressure has allowed some of the feeder finger tip’s underlying metal to show through on an otherwise silver-white item, especially on the “reverse.” This error coin was sold for $5,980.

6. 2007-P Presidential Dollar. George Washington: Double Struck 35% Off Center

Price: $5,875

Grade: MS66

2007-P Presidential Dollar. George Washington

According to our knowledge, this error coin is exclusive to the problem. Other off-center and multiple-struck coins are known, although they are all uncommon. However, none has combined these two faults so closely.

The coin is 35% off-center and totally double-struck. Even if there is only a millimeter or so between the imprints, the previous impression can still be seen on both sides. It does have a nice detail in the area that was struck, with very no handling visible.

7. Undated (2007) Presidential Dollar Thomas Jefferson: Struck 30% Off Center

Price: $2,937.50

Grade: MS66

Undated (2007) Presidential Dollar Thomas Jefferson

An intriguing and extremely rare mistake with the dollar. This coin is exclusive to the issue, as far as we know. Although absolutely off-center coins are extremely uncommon in the Presidential dollar series, it is possible to discover double-struck, thrice-struck, and missing edge letter variants.

Jefferson’s entire face could be seen on the obverse of the striking, while the full upper body, head, and torch of the Statue of Liberty could be seen there on the reverse. Under close examination, nearly complete mint brilliance shows only a faint hint of pastel iridescence. This coin is extremely uncommon, highly shiny, and appealing.

8. 2010 Presidential Dollar Franklin Pierce: Broadstruck on Blank, Missing Edge Lettering

Price: $1,495

Grade: MS65

2010 Presidential Dollar Franklin Pierce

Clearly centered, with somewhat enlarged letters at the rims due to the absence of a collar. dazzling mint’s new sheen. The 2010-P Presidential Dollar (Franklin Pierce Variety) in uncirculated mint condition is estimated at $2.28 or more. The 2010-D Franklin Pierce dollar is about the same value in average condition.

The coin featured here was sold for $1,495 and this is because of a rare error. During the minting process, it was broad struck on a blank and the lettering on edge is missing.

9. Undated (2007-P) Presidential Dollar. George Washington: Struck Six Times and Broadstruck, Missing Edge Lettering

Price: $690

Grade: MS66

Undated (2007-P) Presidential Dollar. George Washington

Although PCGS claims that the Philadelphia Mint is to blame for this inaccuracy, the mint mark is not visible on the edge. Of course, the Washington design identifies the item as being from 2007.

The inaccuracy is particularly obvious towards the edges, where several impressions may be seen, some of which have a broad dispersion. The coin has a stronger honey-gold tint that is lightly toned with pale-pink accents. Despite being an error coin, this coin is a beauty to behold.

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10. Undated (2007-P) Presidential Dollar. John Adams: Overlapped Double Struck and Broadstruck, Missing Edge Lettering

Price: $368

Grade: MS64

Undated (2007-P) Presidential Dollar. John Adams

The coin has been mounted by PCGS with the reverse facing up in the holder, and it’s odd that the Philadelphia Mint is being blamed for this blunder given that the mintmark isn’t visible on the edge.

This presidential error coin has a strong brassy-gold hue with a slight haziness that is not always visible. The only noticeable flaw is a little verdigris spot on the reverse. It was sold at auction for $368.

11. 2007 Adams Dollar Plain Edge: Struck Seven Times, Strikes 3 Through 7 40% Off Center

Price: $3,120

Grade: MS66

2007 Adams Dollar Plain Edge

The coin’s lack of edge inscription was the initial mistake, which raised its value. However, this is minor in comparison to the more important and obvious faults of this coin. The piece was struck once, off-center by about 40 percent. Six more times, it was struck with almost no rotation between the first and seventh strikes.

The bright golden manganese composition is mellowed and reddish in appearance on the last six strikes. The coin was sold for $3,120 on Heritage Auctions.

12. 2010 $1 Millard Fillmore Presidential Dollar, Missing Edge Lettering: Clad Layer Missing On Obverse

Price: $352.50

Grade: MS66

2010 $1 Millard Fillmore Presidential Dollar, Missing Edge Lettering

On February 18, 2010, the U.S. Mint formally released the 2010 Millard Fillmore coins. The 13th President of the United States of America was Millard Fillmore. From 1850 until 1853, Fillmore served as president.

The Uncirculated (MS+) Mint Condition 2010 Presidential Dollar (Millard Fillmore Variety) is worth $2.28 or more. However, some error coins such as the one featured here (Missing Edge Lettering: Clad Layer Missing On Obverse)

13. Undated (2007-?) Presidential Dollar John Adams: Triple Struck, 3rd Strike 80% Off Center, Missing Edge Lettering

Price: $891.25

Grade: MS65

Presidential Dollar John Adams

Beautiful brassy-gold hues accent features with a satiny finish. At eight o’clock, the third strike is off-center. The initial strike is still discernible under a loupe, but the second strike is the most prominent and takes center stage in terms of the design’s external appearance.

For this error, the first and second strikes were okay, however, the third strike was 80% off the center of the coin thus resulting in this rare error. This rare error presidential coin was sold for $891.25.

14. (2007) Jefferson Presidential Dollar: Obverse Manganese Layer Missing, Missing Edge Lettering

Price: $381.38

Grade: MS64

(2007) Jefferson Presidential Dollar

This Jefferson dollar was struck from a defective strip that was lacking a clad layer on the side that became the Jefferson side of the coin, and it also skipped the production stage for the edge inscription. The (undesignated) weight, the mild peripheral strike, and the pale orange-gold tint are all telltale indicators. Numerous minor strikethroughs may be seen along the obverse border when it was produced.

This rare error coin was sold at auction for $381.38. On average, the estimated value for a 2007-P Presidential Dollar (Thomas Jefferson variety) in uncirculated mint condition is $2.28 or more.

15. (2007) $1 Madison Presidential Dollar: Double Struck on an Aluminum Finger Feeder Tip

Price: $8,050

Grade: MS66

(2007) $1 Madison Presidential Dollar

This Madison dollar was made from scrap aluminum, most likely a piece from a planchet feeder. The scrap has ragged edges and is rectangular in shape. Since the uneven diameter prohibited passage through the edge lettering device, there is no date or mintmark on the coin.

The majority of the key gadgets are present and have a shiny, light gray tone. Double hit with the first impression’s traces most noticeable close to STATES. This presidential error coin was sold for $8,050.

16. (2007) $1 Washington Presidential Dollar–Multiple Struck, Huge Broadstrike, Missing Edge Lettering

Price: $920

Grade: MS64

(2007) $1 Washington Presidential Dollar

This George Washington mistake coin was struck several times without a working collar die, and it has a well-centered broad strike with a huge diameter. It was sold for $920.

Despite the fact that many Washington dollars are without edge lettering, the current coin has a valid explanation for its plain edge: its diameter prevents it from fitting through the edge lettering machine. At nine o’clock, obverse edge damage is visible, possibly as produced.

17. 2007 Madison Presidential Dollar: Missing Edge Lettering, Reverse Manganese Layer Missing

Price: $402

Grade: MS64

2007 Madison Presidential Dollar

Like their Sacagawea and Native American counterparts, Presidential dollars are made of an inner core of pure copper and two outer layers of manganese brass. The planchet was cut close to the end of the strip, or poor layer bonding caused an outer layer to split off, maybe during the piece’s passage through the upset mill, leaving this piece lacking the outer manganese brass layer on the reverse.

A second mint fault occurred when this dollar was unable to pass through the edge lettering machine. The centers are fully brought up, yet the borders are softly impressed, as one might anticipate from a thin planchet.

18. 2008 $1 Jackson Presidential Dollar: Die Adjustment Strike, Missing Edge Lettering

Price: $1,380

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Grade: MS64

2008 $1 Jackson Presidential Dollar

The second of two die adjustment strikes on Jackson dollars found in 2008 is this one. Although the centers have an acceptable definition because of the dies’ excessive spacing, the borders are poorly struck and lack any other apparent legends than the denomination.

A second and perhaps associated mint fault occurred on a Type Two planchet with raised border, but the piece was never put through the edge lettering machine. Basically as made without any grade-restricting marks.

19. 2009-D $1 Polk Presidential Dollar: Die Adjustment Strike

Price: $1,265

Grade: Not Graded

2009-D $1 Polk Presidential Dollar

This rare error coin sold for $1,295. The devices’ principal aspects exhibit reasonable definitions, but peripheral design components are inadequately highlighted. There is no intelligible wording seen on the edge through the current generation NGC holder.

Polk’s photo is unworn but does have a few minor blemishes. Significant mint errors from the twenty-first century are uncommon, especially on recently minted coins.

20. 2007-S $1 Jefferson Presidential Dollar: Struck on an Elliptical Planchet

Price: $632.50

Grade: PR69

2007-S $1 Jefferson Presidential Dollar

The Jefferson presidential coin also had its share of errors. On average, a Thomas Jefferson Presidential coin is worth $2.28 more in Uncirculated condition. However, error coins have been found and sold for values higher than the face value of the coin.

The outer rim, which is broad elsewhere, narrows and then vanishes at the lower borders because the planchet is out of round in the area between 4 and 8 o’clock relative to the obverse. The illusion is enhanced by the concentric circles on the reverse, despite the fact that we have no idea how the planchet was made. A spotless piece with striking contrasts.

The History Of Presidential Coins

The Presidential $1 Coin Program, which began in 2007, is a series of U.S. dollar coins featuring portraits of U.S. presidents on the obverse and the Statue of Liberty on the reverse. The minting of Presidential dollars from 2007 to 2011 produced a large stockpile of unused $1 coins.

Like the 50 State quarters initiative, the program started on January 1, 2007, and it wasn’t supposed to conclude until every qualified subject had been recognized.

The plan was to produce coins with the likeness of each of the four presidents on the obverse each year, issuing one for three months before moving on to the following president in order of their terms in office.

In order to be eligible for inclusion in the Presidential $1 Coin Program, a deceased president must have been out of office for at least two years prior to the time of minting.

In the course of production, an unknown number of Presidential dollar coins had minting errors, most of which went into circulation. Today, the rarest and most valuable presidential coins are error coins.

By 2011, the mint had produced 1.4 billion uncirculated $1 coins, which could stretch from Los Angeles to Chicago if they were laid flat. By 2016, that number might have reached two billion if the minting rate didn’t change.

The U.S. Government Accountability Office has estimated that replacing the dollar bill with the dollar coin would save the U.S. government $5.5 billion over 30 years.

On December 13, 2011, Vice President Joe Biden and Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner announced that the production of $1 coins bearing American presidents would be halted.

Are any of the presidential dollars worth anything?

A presidential coin in perfect condition with no errors is only worth its face value or a little margin above its face value. You can purchase an uncirculated presidential coin for $1-2. However, the real worth of these coins can be found in error coins. Many presidential dollars with errors exist and can sell for as high as $10,000 or more.

Final Words

These rare presidential dollar errors are one of a kind and uniquely worth their respective prices. The coins were auctioned off partly due to their rarity, but also because this is a collector’s niche market. There are a host of factors at play when it comes to the value of rare coins, including the type of error and its desirability. The above 20 presidential dollar coins show just how unique some coins can be.

While it’s possible to acquire some of them if you aren’t too picky and take a gamble, they nevertheless represent the most affluent game in collecting. And with the value of coin collecting growing exponentially, these rare coins are sure to be worth much more in the near future.

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