15 Most Valuable Antique Bottles Worth A Fortune

Antique bottles are really a thing of beauty, some are highly collectible while others are priceless. The antique bottles market is increasing and prices are high. I decided to make this list of the 15 most valuable antique bottles worth a fortune to help collectors know what’s out there and what’s valuable.

There are countless antique bottles out there that can fetch a pretty penny, some worth over $1,000. Whether they are kept in cabinets at home, or on display at a museum – antique bottles are among the most valuable objects that you can find.

15 Most Valuable Antique Bottles

A valued collection of antique bottles is a great addition to any home. Antique bottles have high value these days and are collectibles for both the serious collector and occasional enthusiast. Do you have an antique bottle and want to know which one of your bottles is the most valuable? Then you should read this guide. But first, here are the top 15 most valuable antique bottles.

No
Name
Year
Price Sold
1
Maurice Marinot Acid-Etched Glass Bottle
1928
$3000
2
Victorian Porcelain & Silver Scent Bottle
1887
$1,314.50
3
Chelsea Gilt Bronze Mounted Porcelain Figural Scent Bottle
1800
$2000
4
Chelsea Porcelain Double Scent Bottle: Monkeys
1760
$2,750
5
R. Lalique Frosted Glass Ambre Antique Perfume Bottle with Sepia Patina
1910
$1,062.50
6
Continental Porcelain Figural Scent Bottles
1885
$1,750
7
Sèvres Porcelain Long Neck Bottle Vases
1900s
$2000
8
 Inca Bottle with Human Face
1600s
$1,314.50
9
Miniature Meissen Gilt Bronze Mounted Porcelain Scent Bottle with Ram Heads
1740
$937.50
10
French Painted Porcelain Figural Cologne Bottles
1845
$937.50
11
Paris Porcelain Scent Bottles
1880
$896.25
12
Robj Art Deco Mammy Bottle
1920
$717
13
Porcelain Scent Bottle
1900s
$657.25
14
New London Glass Works Yellow Pint Bottle
1860
$593.75
15
Union Clasped Hands Amber Bottle with Eagle and Shield on Reverse
1860
$468.75

1. Maurice Marinot Acid-Etched Glass Bottle

Year: 1928

Price: $3000

1. Maurice Marinot Acid-Etched Glass Bottle

Maurice Marinot, a Fauvist painter, became fascinated with glassmaking after visiting the Viard glass factory in 1911. He began by enameling clear glass blanks supplied by the factory; he also apprenticed himself to the factory’s gaffers, and soon began to blow his own forms and to engrave or acid-etch geometric and abstract patterns onto their surfaces.

Above is a clear example of a masterpiece made by the famous Maurice Marinot, an Acid-Etched bottle dating back to 1928 and worth over $3000.

Maurice Marinot Acid-Etched Glass Bottle, 1928. Marks: Marinot: Opening Bid:

$3,000

2. Victorian Porcelain & Silver Scent Bottle

Year: 1887

Price: $1,314.50

2. Victorian Porcelain & Silver Scent Bottle

Meet this Victorian Porcelain bottle worthy of being on our list of most valuable antique bottles. This bottle has a spider web pattern in blue enamel. It has black spiders and flies. It has black flies around the edges of the bottle, too. There is a silver thread around the lid of the antique bottle.

The bottle dates back to 1887! It was sold at Heritage Auctions on the 27th of April, 2007 for $1,314.50, thus making it one of the most highly valuable antique bottles.

Victorian Porcelain and Silver Scent Bottle. S. Mordan & Co., Ltd, London, England (silver). 1887. Porcelain with enamel Sold on Apr 27, 2007 for: $1,314.50

3. Chelsea Gilt Bronze Mounted Porcelain Figural Scent Bottle

Year: 1800

Price: $2000

3. Chelsea Gilt Bronze Mounted Porcelain Figural Scent Bottle

The Chelsea Gilt Bronze Mounted Porcelain Figural Scent Bottle is a good example of the combination of the two. This piece is unique in that it has a porcelain body with a bronze cap. The bottle is made in the shape of a woman and has an intricate design all over it. The bronze cap has a beautiful design on top as well as on the base.

If you have this laying around in your home it might be worth $2000 or more. On the 12th of September, 2015, it sold in an auction for $2000.

A Chelsea Gilt Bronze Mounted Porcelain Figural Scent Bottle: The Three Graces, circa 1800: Sold on Sep 12, 2015 for: $2,000.00

4. Chelsea Porcelain Double Scent Bottle: Monkeys

Year: 1760

Price: $2,750

4. Chelsea Porcelain Double Scent Bottle Monkeys

The bottle is in the form of a mother monkey carrying a baby monkey in a basket of flowers, all raised on a dome base with floral decoration on the underside. The overall condition is very good, although there are some minor chips to the flowers. Bottles such as this were used for holding perfumes or scented oils.

This Chelsea Porcelain Double Scent Bottle was sold at auction for $2,750 on the 27th of September, 2015, thus making it one of the most valuable antique bottles worth a fortune.

A Chelsea Porcelain Double Scent Bottle: Monkeys circa 1760. 2-3/8 inches high (6.0 cm): Sold on Sep 12, 2015 for: $2,750.00

5. R. Lalique Frosted Glass Ambre Antique Perfume Bottle with Sepia Patina

Year: 1910

Price: $1,062.50

5. R. Lalique Frosted Glass Ambre Antique Perfume Bottle with Sepia Patina

You have to admit, this is an absolutely stunning perfume bottle. I’m already taken aback by the sheer beauty of this piece. I’m just going to get the cons out of the way early: One small flake missing to the bottom bit of the stopper, one minuscule flea bite to the base but only visible with close inspection.

A true testament to Lalique’s genius because without those small imperfections this would not be an old glass bottle but rather an art deco sculpture.

  1. Lalique Frosted Glass Ambre Antique Perfume Bottle with Sepia Patina for Coty: Sold on May 25, 2017 for:$1,062.50

6. Continental Porcelain Figural Scent Bottles

Year: 1885

Price: $1,750

6. Continental Porcelain Figural Scent Bottles

A pair of continental porcelain figural scent bottles were sold on December 6, 2012, for $1,750.00. The pair of figural scent bottles in the form of a man and a woman, each with an exotic Turkish costume.

Condition: It has slight errors that aren’t too noticeable like minor losses to glaze and gilding, and hairline cracks through the hair of the female figure. The maker is unknown, but would probably be French or Bohemian.

Pair Of Continental Porcelain Figural Scent Bottles: Sold on Dec 6, 2012 for: $1,750.00

7. Sèvres Porcelain Long Neck Bottle Vases

Year: 1900s

Price: $2,000

7. Sèvres Porcelain Long Neck Bottle Vases

This pair of Sèvres Porcelain Long Neck Bottle Vases dates back to the 19th century and are Properties From The Collection Of Carolyn And Starke Taylor, Dallas. The value of these bottles might be lesser without the second bottle.

On the 12th of September, 2015, these bottles sold in an auction for $2,000. The current bid price for them is $2,600 which clearly shows that their value has gone higher. Care to add this to your collection? That would be a good investment or decor.

A Pair of Sèvres Porcelain Long Neck Bottle Vases, 19th century: Sold on Sep 12, 2015 for: $2,000.00

8. Inca Bottle with Human Face

Year:1600s

Price: $1,314.50

8. Inca Bottle with Human Face

The form of this vessel is similar in size and shape to typical Inca water pots. The rounded body is a carved mold with a checkerboard pattern painted around the waist. A strong geometric design extends from the mouth of the figure to each side.

The face, unusual for these vessels, is modeled and painted with the head of a personage. The intact checkerboard pattern on these artful wares is an unusual detail that may have some mythological association. The Inca Bottle With Human Face was sold at auction on the 5th of December, 2010 for a whopping $1,314.50 making it one of the most valuable antique bottles worth a fortune.

Inca Bottle with Human Face: SOLD ON DEC 5, 2010 FOR: $1,314.50

9. Miniature Meissen Gilt Bronze Mounted Porcelain Scent Bottle with Ram Heads

Year: 1740

Price: $937.50

9. Miniature Meissen Gilt Bronze Mounted Porcelain Scent Bottle with Ram Heads

This is a Miniature Meissen Gilt Bronze Mounted Porcelain Scent Bottle with Ram Heads. It was hand-painted with fine detail. This scent bottle is a miniature from the 1700s or possibly early 1800s. It is 2-7/8 inches high, roughly half the height of a full-size Meissen scent bottle. The brass at the bottom reveals it is not silver or gold plated, but a high-quality gilt bronze. The porcelain is slipped and polished as you’d expect on full-size pieces.

This lovely antique piece is worth above $900. On the 12th of September, 2015, it was sold for $937.50 on a popular auction platform.

A Miniature Meissen Gilt Bronze Mounted Porcelain Scent Bottle with Ram Heads: SOLD ON SEP 12, 2015 FOR: $937.50

10. French Painted Porcelain Figural Cologne Bottles

Year: 1845

Price: $937.50

10. French Painted Porcelain Figural Cologne Bottles

The cologne bottle of a seated man and the other bottle of a seated female and dove, both in Turkish dress, with green bases. They date back to “Circa 1845”. The bottles are 5-1/8 inches high with a few errors that are barely noticeable.

Cons: Minor abrasions to the man’s hand, minor abrasions to the woman’s hand, with minimum loss of paint and rubbing of gilt. Both pieces sold together in an auction on the 14th of September, 2014 for $937.50.

Two French Painted Porcelain Figural Cologne Bottles: Sold On Sep 14, 2014 For: $937.50

11. Paris Porcelain Scent Bottles

Year: 1880

Price: $896.25

11. Paris Porcelain Scent Bottles

A unique pair of Paris Porcelain scent bottles that date back to the Mid/Late 19th century. Both bottles are about 7 inches in height. Both are cylindrical-shaped vases and tea jars with pagoda-form stoppers, decorated with oval scenes from the hunt against a blue and white reserved ground, decorated with floral gilt scroll designs.

They were sold on the 27th of April, 2007 for $895.25 on an auction platform. However, the current worth for both vases is about $1,344.

2 Paris Porcelain Scent Bottles SOLD ON APR 27, 2007 FOR: $896.25

12. Robj Art Deco Mammy Bottle

Year: 1920

Price: $717

12. Robj Art Deco Mammy Bottle

This 1920s-era earthenware bottle depicts an uncommonly chic black mammy in a turban that disengages to reveal a cork for your wine. The image is off-white with gray underglaze on the bottom reading: “Robj Paris, Made in France”. Excellent condition, 10.25″ high.

On the 7th of June, 2006, this Robj Art Deco Mammy bottle was auctioned and sold to the highest bidder for $717. Its current value should be well above $717 now.

Robj Art Deco Mammy Bottle: Sold on Jun 7, 2006 for:$717.00

13. Porcelain Scent Bottle

Year: 1900s

Price: $657.25

13. Porcelain Scent Bottle

This scent bottle, made of porcelain and designed to look like a pickle, is capped with a silver-plated hinged lid that dates back to the 19th century. It is 6-1/2 inches (16.5 cm) long and worthy of being among our list of most valuable antique bottles. It has no cons and is truly a beauty to behold.

It sold on November 9th, 2009 for $657.25. The value of this antique bottle has probably increased over time.

A Porcelain Scent Bottle: Sold on Nov 9, 2009 for: $657.25

14. New London Glass Works Yellow Pint Bottle

Year: 1860

Price: $593.75

14. New London Glass Works Yellow Pint Bottle

New London Glass Works, an early American glass producer, created this yellow pint bottle with a break just below the applied band. The base is smooth and has no other problems. This antique glass is valued above $500.

On the 24th of November, 2013, this New London Glass Works bottle sold at an auction for $593.75. Word has it that this antique bottle has sold higher elsewhere, realizing above $1000.

New London Glass Works Yellow Pint Bottle Sold on Nov 24, 2013 for:$593.75

15. Union Clasped Hands Amber Bottle

Year: 1860

Price: $468.75

15. Union Clasped Hands Amber Bottle

This Union Clasped Hands Amber Bottle is yet another valuable antique bottle worth money. A close-up look shows that the bottle features an eagle and a shield on the reverse. It was rampant in the 19th century but is now a scarce and highly valued antique.

Union Clasped Hands Amber Bottle with Eagle and Shield on Reverse: Sold on Nov 24, 2013, for: $468.75

Antique Bottles: A Brief History

Bottles made from glass are common in many households. The earliest glass bottles were made in southeast Asia around 100 B.C. and in the Roman Empire around 1 AD. The glass bottle and jar industry in America was born in the early 1600s when settlers in Jamestown built the first glass-melting furnace.

Bottles were first created during ancient times by people who melted raw materials into glass and then dipped the rim of clay vessels into the melted glass. However, Glass was not used for making bottles and jars until the mid-nineteenth century. Earthenware and pottery vessels were preferred objects used for storage before the Industrial Revolution, but as the revolution expanded, glass bottles became the vessel of choice.

The Victorian Era

Back in the day, Victorians worried a lot about illnesses, and the rodents that carried diseases were a huge health problem. When the food industry grew and provided more food to people, interest turned toward the use of chemicals to kill pests and eliminate plant diseases.

Medicinal bottles were the most popular glass bottles manufactured in the late 1800s into the 20th century. During this time, people produced many thousands of different brands and variations of medicinal products. Many early medicinal bottles can be recognized by their shape and size. They are typically dark green with a large mouth opening. Back in the day before electricity was invented, Victorians would mistake poison for medicine, and then came labeling of medicinal bottles to help avoid using the wrong medication.

These old bottles that date back to the 18th through 19th centuries have become a valuable commodity today. They are highly valued and could be worth a fortune in your hands. Some people see purchasing antique bottles as an investment that would be appreciated in the future and they are right!

How To Identify And Date Antique Bottles

How To Identify And Date Antique Bottles

The markings on glass bottles can help determine the value of an antique bottle. The first step to take is finding the markings on the bottle.

Examine the bottle carefully to find the markings. The side of the bottle may be printed with the product or manufacturer’s name, and this can be helpful in identifying or dating your antique bottle. If you do not find it on the side, you might want to check at the bottom of the bottle.

Sometimes, due to wear and tear, the markings on the side or beneath the bottle might have gone off. A quick trick around this would be rubbing some charcoal on the area where the marking is almost invisible, then placing the charcoaled area on a white piece of paper or cloth.

Marking Types

So, you’ve identified the marking on your bottle? That’s great! Now, let’s categorize it by type. Here are some categories;

  • Embossed marks
  • Manufacturers marks
  • Pontil marks.
  • Mold lines

Embossed Marks

Bottles often have embossed letters or product names on the sides. These may include the words Medicine or the manufacturer’s name. The embossing on a bottle can often tell you what you need to know—for example, what type of liquor was in the bottle and when and where it was bottled.

Embossed Marks
Source Pinterest – An antique Bottle with embossed markings

 

Manufacturers’ Marks

A maker’s mark often appears on the bottom of the bottle. It can be any form of a number, letter, symbol, or name. A perfect example is “Coca Cola”. You can tell the year of a bottle by comparing the manufacturer’s marks with different marks from the same manufacturer in the past.

Manufacturers' Marks

If you look closely at the patent statement embossed just beneath the name Coca-Cola on a contour bottle of Coke, you can date the coke bottle.

Pontil Marks

Circular marks on the bottom of a bottle are called pontil marks, and they mean that the bottle was made of free-blown glass. A pontil mark is one of many ways to tell the age and quality of an antique glass piece, as well as one attribute that contributes to a glass bottle or piece of glassware being valuable.

Pontil Types
Glass tipped pontil scar Created by using a solid iron bar as the pontil rod
Blowpipe pontil scar Formed when a hollow blowpipe is used as the pontil rod
Sand pontil scar Pressed glass was formed when hot glass gathered on the flared or ball-shaped end of an iron pontil rod. The tip of the rod is slightly cooled, then dipped in sand.
Bare iron pontil scar The iron pontil scar is a result of using a heated iron rod to heat the base of the bottle

Mold Marks

 Mold lines and machine marks appear on many antique bottles from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. See the image below, it can help you identify or narrow down the year of your antique bottle.

Mold Marks

Colored Glass Bottle Types

Antique bottles often display muted colors that aren’t often seen on modern bottles. Although the color is important in describing a bottle, there are three reasons why it isn’t always as useful in dating or identifying the bottle.

  • The color of the glass is not indicative of the glass’s type.
  • The color of the glass often has little impact on the function of a glass object.
  • Color or texture do not affect the glass bottle’s production method.
Color Date
Amber Glass 1701-1860
Aqua Glass 1850-1880
Black Glass 1840-1880
Red Glass 1840-1880
Clear Glass 1870s
Green Glass 1801-2000
Blue-Green Glass 1801-2000
Olive-Green Glass 1800s
Amber Glass 1800s
Milky Glass 1870s-1967
Purple Glass 1840s-1880s

How To Find Antique Bottles


You want to find some old bottles but don’t know where to start. What you really need is a guide that tells you where to look. You need to know what kind of bottles are collectible and present a good investment.

It’s not hard to find antique bottles. In fact, there are many antique bottles available for sale on the web and even in your local antique shops. However, don’t rule out searching out in the woods. You might just be lucky.

Final Words

One of the best ways to start looking for antique bottles is to simply ask around. Family members, friends, neighbors, and others will likely know if anyone local has an unusual bottle stashed away in the basement, forgotten attic, or even an old shed.

Being that antique bottles are no longer in regular use and there is supply and demand, their value will continue to rise. The more you buy and hold on to these antiques the more money you will make. If you happen to have an antique bottle you want to sell, contact an antique dealer near you for a fair asking price. To most collectors, it’s not just about the intrinsic value of an antique bottle, but also the history that makes it priceless!

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