15 Most Valuable Jefferson Nickels Ever Sold

Every coin collector likes to locate scarce, valuable coins from time to time — Jefferson nickels included. While it isn’t possible to determine the overall worth of a Jefferson nickel in advance, it is possible to pick out certain nickels that are worth considerably more than others. Simply put, there are 15 most valuable Jefferson nickels that you should be on the lookout for.

When you go to the bank, how much is a nickel worth? That depends on a few factors. The type of nickel, its condition, and its age all contribute to the value. Jefferson nickels have been minted from 1938 until today. This 84 year period has seen many rare coins come out of the U.S. Mint. I’d like to share with you some of the most valuable Jefferson nickels that still exist today.

How are these coins valuable? They were graded by the famous PCGS and sold at auctions for higher than normal prices.

The History Of Jefferson Nickels

Since 1938, the nickel-plated coin bearing the likeness of Thomas Jefferson has been the United States five-cent coin, replacing the Buffalo nickel. Since 1938, the obverse of this coin has featured a portrait of the third U.S. President, Thomas Jefferson, by artist Felix Schlag.

In 1913, the Buffalo nickel was minted; however after it completed the 25-year term during which it could be replaced only by Congress, the Mint decided to replace it with a completely different design. The Mint held a design competition in 1938, in which the design elements on both sides of its coin were required to include Jefferson and his home Monticello. Schlag’s design won the competition, but he was forced to make changes before the new piece went into production in October 1938.

The first Jefferson nickels were struck at all three U.S. Mints—Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco—on October 3, 1938. Nearly 12 million had been struck throughout the mints by mid-November; and on November 15th they were officially released into circulation.

During World War II, the Jefferson Nickel was minted with silver because of the limited availability of nickel used for military equipment.

The Jefferson Nickel has been produced with different designs over the years, but remains a classic U.S. Mint circulation coin. Popular today, the coin is still being produced by the U.S. Mint.

15 Most Valuable Jefferson Nickels Ever Sold At Auction (Price & Chart)

What Jefferson nickels are worth keeping? Well, we made a list that contains 15 Most Valuable Jefferson Nickels sold at auction sites hence their value. If you had one of these in your possession you could be sitting on a gold mine.

No.
Name
Year
Grade
Price Sold
1
1942 D Jefferson Nickel: D Over Horizontal D
1942
MS66
$31,725
2
1949 D Jefferson Nickel: D Over S
1949
MS67
$32,900
3
1939 Jefferson Nickel Reverse of 1940
1939
MS68
$23,500
4
1953 Jefferson Nickel
1953
PR68
$15,275
5
1947 S Jefferson Nickel
1947
MS67
$14,950
6
1952 Jefferson Nickel
1952
PR68
$14,950
7
1941 D Jefferson Nickel Full Steps
1941
MS68
$9,900
8
1945 P Jefferson Nickel
1945
MS67+
$9,987.50
9
1956 Jefferson Nickel
1956
MS67
$9,400
10
1939 Jefferson Nickel
1939
MS67
$9,400
11
1944 P Jefferson Nickel
1944
MS67+
$9,400
12
1963 D Jefferson Nickel
1963
MS65
$9,200
13
1938 S Jefferson Nickel
1938
MS67
$9,200
14
1945 S Jefferson Nickel
1945
MS68
$8,625
15
1958 Jefferson Nickel
1958
PR68
$8,225

1. 1942 D Jefferson Nickel: D Over Horizontal D $31,725

Year: 1942

Grade: MS66

Price: $31,725.00

1. 1942 D Jefferson Nickel D Over Horizontal D $31,725

Meet the first on our list of the most valuable Jefferson Nickels. The 1942 D Jefferson Nickels : D Over Horizontal D is not only valuable but very rare. This Jefferson Nickel variety is a mint mark error; D was stamped over a faint D that was positioned horizontally. In fact the total number of these coins out there is unknown. According to PCGS, this error was caused by a mint employee. The issue was later resolved.

If you have a Jefferson nickel minted in 1942 and it has the numeral “D” which refers to the Denver Mint and the “D” is over a horizontal “D,” it could be worth $51 in average condition and could go for $1,713 to $11,088 or more in uncirculated (MS+) mint condition.

1942-D 5C D Over Horizontal D, FS-501, MS66 Sold on Feb 4, 2016 for: $31,725.00

2. 1949 D Jefferson Nickel: D Over S $32,900

Year: 1949

Grade: MS67

Price: $32,900.00

2. 1949 D Jefferson Nickel D Over S $32,900

The 1949 D Jefferson Nickel: D Over S is yet another valuable Jefferson Nickel due to its error. Up till this moment we do not know how many of these errors were minted, so, you could be lucky enough to stumble upon one while clearing out your grand dad’s basement. The Mint made a rare mistake in the production of the 1949 D Jefferson Nickel, and If you look closely at the “D” mint mark, you may find that it covers up an “S” mint mark.

The 1949-D Jefferson nickel with the over S variety can sell for $169 to $558 or more in uncirculated mint condition. On the 5th of June, 2014, one of the finest 1949 D/S Jefferson Nickels was sold at Heritage Auctions for $32,900.00.

1949-D Over S Nickel, MS67 Full Steps Sold on Jun 5, 2014 for: $32,900.00

3. 1939 Jefferson Nickel Reverse of 1940 $23,500

Year: 1939

Grade: MS68

Price: $23,500.00

3. 1939 Jefferson Nickel Reverse of 1940 $23,500

The 1939 Jefferson Nickel issue belongs to the Pre-War composition and it is quite rare and valuable. Even with a total mintage of 120,627,535, it is considered very rare in pristine condition. The reverse of the 1940 Jefferson nickels contains straight steps and is noted for having a strong design.

A Jefferson nickel minted in 1939 is valued at about $0.17 in average condition, but if it is uncirculated or in mint condition it can be worth $2.28 to $13 or more. Some rare proof Jefferson nickels are valued at $140 or more. However, A 1939 5C Reverse of 1940 in MS68 condition was sold for $23,500. It all boils down to how clean the coin is after so many years.

1939 5C Reverse of 1940 MS68 Full Steps Sold on Feb 27, 2014 for: $23,500.00

4. 1953 Jefferson Nickel: $15,275

Year: 1953

Grade: PR68

Price: $15,275

4. 1953 Jefferson Nickel $15,275

Wondering why a 1953 issue is on our list of most valuable Jefferson Nickels? U.S. Mint nickels produced in 1953 are generally of a high quality. PCGS graded a 1953 Jefferson Nickel Deep Cameo in PR68 and it was auctioned for $15,275 on the 25th of April, 2013.

The 1953 Jefferson Nickel belongs to the Pre-War composition and was minted at Philadelphia mint with over 45 million coins struck. However, due to its age, it is almost impossible to find this coin in a PR68 deep cameo. The estimated value of a 1953 Jefferson nickel in uncirculated (MS+) mint condition is $0.28 to $9.13, while proof versions can be worth up to $51.00.

1953 5C PR68 Deep Cameo: Sold on Apr 25, 2013 for: $15,275.00

5. 1947 S Jefferson Nickel $14,950

Year: 1947

Grade: MS67

Price: $14,950

5. 1947 S Jefferson Nickel $14,950

The 1947-S Jefferson Nickel is reasonably abundant, and is available in most grades. Over 24 million examples were produced, but there are many dates with much smaller mintages and others with higher mintages.

In Mint State 65 or lower, it is not difficult to obtain. It can be purchased at very reasonable prices. In Mint State 66 with Full Steps, it is scarce. In Mint State 67 with Full Steps, it is rare and usually only serious collectors can own one.

In average condition, a 1947-S Jefferson nickel is worth $0.45. In uncirculated (MS+) mint condition, the coin can be worth $1.13 to $13 or more.

1947-S 5C MS67 Full Step Sold on May 10, 2007 for: $14,950.00

6. 1952 Jefferson Nickel $14,950

Year: 1952

Grade: PR68

Price: $14,950

6. 1952 Jefferson Nickel $14,950

The 1952 Jefferson Nickel was struck at three mints, Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco, with over 100 million coins struck in total. Getting your hands on an average 1952 Jefferson Nickel “without the mint mark” isn’t difficult. It is very affordable and can be easily seen, hence not much value.

The value of the 1952 Jefferson Nickel increases in higher conditions such as the MS66 or PR68. A perfect example of a valuable Jefferson Nickel in the same year would be an issue that was auctioned for $14,950. According to PCGS the coin is PR68 and in Deep Cameo.

1952 5C PR68 Deep Cameo Sold on Jan 7, 2010 for: $14,950.00

7. 1941 D Jefferson Nickel Full Steps $9,900

Year: 1941

Grade: MS68

Price: $9,900

7. 1941 D Jefferson Nickel Full Steps $9,900

The 1941 D Jefferson Nickel has a composition of 75% Copper, the rest of the coin is made of Nickel thus causing the melt value of this coin to be very low. However, if you own this coin in great condition you won’t even think about melting it for value.

In average condition, a 1941-D Jefferson Nickel issued by the United States Mint can be worth $0.17 in USA Coin Book Estimated Value. However, it would be worth $2.81 to $11 or more in Uncirculated (MS+) Mint Condition. Regardless of these numbers, when you own a coin such as the 1941 D Jefferson Nickel you could be sitting on a gold mine. On the 10th of January, a rare MS68 condition was sold for $9,900.

1941-D 5C MS68 Full Steps Sold on Jan 10, 2019 for: $9,900.00

8. 1945 P Jefferson Nickel $9,987.50

Year: 1945

Grade: MS67

Price: $9,987.50

8. 1945 P Jefferson Nickel $9,987.50

The 1945 P Jefferson Nickel belongs to the wartime composition. Coins struck in the Philadelphia mint usually do not have mintmarks, however, the case was different for the 1945 P Jefferson Nickel as the “P” Mintmark is clearly present on the reverse of the coin just below E PLURIBUS UNUM.”

The value of this coin just like others is dependent on its quality or condition. On the 9th of July 2015, a 1945 P Jefferson graded MS67+ by PCGS was auctioned for $9,987.50 in heritage auctions. The estimated value of a 1945-P Jefferson Nickel in average condition is $1.98, but the coin could be worth up to $6.26 or more in uncirculated (MS+) mint condition.

1945-P 5C MS67+ Full Steps Sold on Jul 9, 2015 for: $9,987.50

9. 1956 Jefferson Nickel $9,400

Year: 1956

Grade: MS67

Price: $9,400

9. 1956 Jefferson Nickel $9,400

In 1956, a total number of 35,885,384 Jefferson Nickels were minted at the Philadelphia mint and all coins carried the 1956 date. It’s been over 70 years and this coin still retains its value, in fact, the value appreciates with time.

On the 4th of July, 2015 a 1956 Jefferson Nickel Graded by PCGS as MS67 Full Steps, was auctioned and sold for $9,400 making it one of the most valuable Jefferson Nickels. While the 1956 nickel is easy to find in high grades, it is extremely difficult to find in Full Steps Superb Gem condition. A 1956 Jefferson nickel in uncirculated mint condition is worth $0.56 to $23 or more, depending on the coin’s grade. Proof coins can be worth up to $4.52.

1956 5C MS67 Full Steps Sold on Jun 4, 2015 for: $9,400.00

10. 1939 Jefferson Nickel $9,400

Year: 1939

Grade: MS67

Price: $9,400

10. 1939 Jefferson Nickel $9,400

The Doubled Dies are the 1939 Doubled Die Reverse, 1943 Doubled Die Obverse, and 1945 Doubled Die Reverse. Here’s a fun fact, there are only three major doubled dies in the entire circulation strike Jefferson Nickel series, and there are some very strict criteria for identifying them.

The 1939 Doubled Die Reverse has the strongest doubling of all three coins. The doubling is most evident in the words FIVE CENTS and is shifted toward the South East. Also the word MONTICELLO is doubled. This is one of the rarest coins in the Jefferson Nickel series.

A 1939 Jefferson Nickel with the “double Monticello” variety may be worth $39 in average condition, or as much as $227 to $1,134 if it has been kept in uncirculated (MS+) mint condition.

1956 5C MS67 Full Steps Sold on Jun 4, 2015 for: $9,400.00

11. 1944 P Jefferson Nickel $9,400

Year: 1944

Grade: MS67+

Price: $9,400

11. 1944 P Jefferson Nickel $9,400

The 1944-P Jefferson nickel, produced during the wartime period when metals were scarce because of the need to save copper and nickel forged into coins, is one of the most abundant silver alloy Jefferson nickels ever minted. It also has the “P” mint mark which isn’t quite common.

In circulated grades, more than 119 million 1944-P nickels have been struck by the U.S. Mint, making them quite common. In Mint State 60 to Mint State 66 condition, they are quite available and can be purchased for less than $25 each. In Mint State 67 conditions, they become quite scarce with more than 4 dozen known and no Mint State 68 examples known.

1944-P 5C MS67+ Full Steps Sold on Mar 21, 2014 for:$9,400.00

12. 1963 D Jefferson Nickel $9,200

Year: 1963

Grade: MS65

Price: $9,200

12. 1963 D Jefferson Nickel $9,200

All of the Jefferson Nickels produced during the 1960s have Full Steps characteristics, but many are quite scarce. The 1963-D is among the scarcest of these nickels in any condition. Although it is scarce in MS-66 with full steps, it is even more scarce in MS-66 with no full steps. There are no examples that exist in MS-66 condition with or without full steps making it a very scarce coin.

According to USA Coin Book, A 1963-D Jefferson Nickel in uncirculated (MS+) condition is worth $0.28 to $34. According to PCGS an MS63 should be worth $523, while MS64 is worth $3000 or more.

1963-D 5C MS65 Full Steps Sold on Jun 26, 2008 for: $9,200.00

13. 1938 S Jefferson Nickel $9,200

Year: 1938

Grade: MS67

Price: $9,200

13. 1938 S Jefferson Nickel $9,200

The 1938 S Jefferson Nickel saw one of the lowest mintages in the history of Jefferson Nickels, only 4,105,000 1938 S Jefferson Nickels were minted at the San Francisco mint, thus causing a reduction in circulating coins at the time.

The 1938-S Jefferson Nickel is worth about $1.42 in average condition, $5.13 in uncirculated mint condition, and can be worth $19 or more in extremely high-grade mint condition. An MS67 Full Steps coin was discovered and it sold for $9,200 on an auction website. A 1938-S Jefferson Nickel in MS67 Full Steps is very rare.

1938-S 5C MS67 Full Steps Sold on Aug 18, 2004 for: $9,200.00

14. 1945 S Jefferson Nickel $8,625

Year: 1945

Grade: MS68

Price: $8,625

14. 1945 S Jefferson Nickel $8,625

The 1945-S War-Time Nickel was the last of the nickel five-cent coins before the Mint resumed using nickel in five-cent pieces. Gems are abundant even in the highest grades, although MS-66 examples become quite scarce in the non-Full Steps version. The finest 1945-S Nickel is a single MS-68.

On average this coin is worth $1.98, the value of the coin increases due to its condition. In uncirculated mint condition, the coin can be worth $6.26 to $23. The melt value of the coin is $1.4015.

1945-S 5C MS68 Sold on Jun 26, 2008 for: $8,625.00

15. 1958 Jefferson Nickel $8,225

Year: 1958

Grade: PR68

Price: $8,225

15. 1958 Jefferson Nickel $8,225

When you look at coins and other collectibles that have been around for decades, you need to evaluate their condition. While some of these items may still be valuable even if they are in very poor condition, collectors usually only desire coins, stamps, and other collectibles that are in tip-top shape.

The 1958 Jefferson Nickel made it to our list of 15 Most Valuable Jefferson Nickels. The 1958 Jefferson Nickel is worth from $0.67 to $13 in uncirculated Mint State condition and from $7.88 to $27.94 or more in proof (PR) condition.

1958 5C PR68 Deep Cameo: Sold on Jan 9, 2013 for: $8,225.00

How Much Is A Complete Set Of Jefferson Nickels Worth

How much is a complete set of Jefferson nickels worth? Or How Much Is A Complete Set Of Jefferson Nickels Worth? I’ve been asked many times by people how much their Jefferson nickel collection is worth, and this guide will help you find out. Firstly, we have to group the coins into compositions so you can easily find them. The Jefferson Nickel compositions are;

  • Pre-war Composition.
  • Wartime Composition.
  • Westward Journey Series.

Pre-War Composition (1938-2003) Value & Chart

Time 1938-2003
Metal Composition 75% Copper – 25% Nickel
Mass/Weight 5 grams
Diameter 21.2mm
Estimated Average Value $0.28-$51

Pre-War Composition (1938-2003) Value & Chart

No.
Year
Mintage
MS60
MS65
PR65
1
1938 P
19,515,365
$3.3
$20
$140
2
1938 D
5,376,000
$7.88
$17
3
1938 S
4,105,000
$5
$19
4
1939 P
120,627,535
$2.28
$13
$140
5
1939 P
N/A
$227
$1,134
6
1939 D
3,514,000
$67
$135
7
1939 S
6,630,000
$20
$83
8
1940 P
176,499,158
$1
$11
$140
9
1940 D
43,540,000
$2.28
$17
10
1940 S
39,690,000
$2.55
$17
11
1941 P
203,283,720
$0.85
$13
$107
12
1941 D
53,432,000
$3
$11
13
1941 S
43,445,000
$3.3
$13
14
1942 P
49,818,600
$5
$17
$107
15
1942 D
13,938,000
$31
$67
16
1942 D
N/A
$1,713
$11,088

Wartime Composition (1942-1945) Value & Chart

Time 1942-1945
Metal Composition 56% Copper – 35% Silver – 9% Manganese
Mass/Weight 5 grams
Diameter 21.2mm
Estimated Average Value $1.88-$35

Wartime Composition (1942-1945) Value & Chart

Have you ever wondered, What Jefferson Nickels Are Silver? Well, here is a table below of all the Jefferson Nickels that have Silver composition. Only the Wartime Composition Jefferson Nickels have 35% Silver.

No.
Year
Mintage
MS60
MS65
1
1942 P
57,900,600
$8.45
$23
2
1942 S
32,900,000
$8.45
$28
3
1943 P
271,165,000
$6.27
$23
4
1943 P
N/A
$257
$785
5
1943 P
N/A
$103
$721
6
1943 D
15,294,000
$7
$23
7
1943 S
104,060,000
$6.27
$23
8
1944 P
119,150,000
$8.45
$28
9
1944 D
32,309,000
$7
$28
10
1944 S
21,640,000
$6.27
$23
11
1945 P
119,408,100
$6.27
$23
12
1945 P
N/A
$84
$910
13
1945 D
37,158,000
$6
$23
14
1945 S
58,939,000
$6.27
$23

Westward Journey Series (2004-2005) Price & Chart

Time 2004-2005
Metal Composition 75% Copper – 25% Nickel
Mass/Weight 5 grams
Diameter 21.2mm

Westward Journey Series (2004-2005) Price & Chart

In 2004, the US Mint began a 1-year commemorative coin program called the Westward Journey Nickels. The series was designed to honor and celebrate both the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark Expedition and Louisiana Purchase. It took place between 1804 through 1806.

No.
Year
Mintage
Details
MS60
MS65
1
2004 P
361,440,000
Peace Medal
$0.28
$0.85
2
2004 D
372,000,000
Peace Medal
$0.28
$0.85
3
2004 S
2,992,069
Peace Medal
       –
        –
4
2004 P
366,720,000
Keelboat
$0
$1
5
2004 D
344,880,000
Keelboat
$0.28
$0.85
6
2004 S
2,965,422
Keelboat
       –
        –
7
2005 P
448,320,000
American Bison
$0.39
$1.43
8
2005 D
487,680,000
American Bison
$0.39
$1.43
9
2005 S
3,344,679
American Bison
10
2005 P
394,080,000
Ocean in View
$0.28
$0.85
11
2005 D
411,120,000
Ocean in View
$0.28
$1
12
2005 S
3,344,679
Ocean in View

Pre-War Composition Continuation From (1946-2003) Value & Chart

No.
Year
Mintage
MS60
MS65
1
1946 P
161,116,000
$0.85
$17
2
1946 D
45,292,200
$1.13
$13
3
1946 S
13,560,000
$1
$13
4
1947 P
95,000,000
$0.85
$13
5
1947 D
37,822,000
$1
$13
6
1947 S
24,720,000
$1.13
$13
7
1948 P
89,348,000
$1.13
$11
8
1948 D
44,734,000
$2
$11
9
1948 S
11,300,000
$1.71
$10
10
1949 P
60,652,000
$2.81
$17
11
1949 D
36,498,000
$1.71
$11
12
1949 D
N/A
$169
$558
13
1949 S
9,716,000
$2
$11
14
1950 P
9,847,386
$2
$8
15
1950 D
2,630,030
$16
$23
16
1951 P
28,609,500
$3
$17
17
1951 D
20,460,000
$4.52
$13
18
1951 S
7,776,000
$2
$13
19
1952 P
64,069,980
$1
$10
20
1952 D
30,638,000
$3.89
$17
21
1952 S
20,572,000
$1.13
$13
22
1953 P
46,772,800
$0.28
$9.13
23
1953 D
59,878,600
$0
$10
24
1953 S
19,210,900
$0.85
$11
25
1954 P
47,917,350
$1.13
$17
26
1954 D
117,136,560
$0.67
$34
27
1954 S
29,384,000
$2
$17
28
1954 S
N/A
$29
$112
29
1955 P
8,266,200
$1
$17
30
1955 D
74,464,100
$0.56
$23
31
1955 D
N/A
$41
$112
32
1956 P
35,885,384
$0.56
$23
33
1956 D
67,222,940
$0.56
$23
34
1957 P
39,655,952
$1
$17
35
1957 D
136,828,900
$0.56
$17
36
1958 P
17,963,652
$0.67
$13
37
1958 D
168,249,120
$0
$13
38
1959 P
28,397,291
$0.28
$11
39
1959 D
160,738,240
$0.28
$9.13
40
1960 P
57,107,602
$0
$9
41
1960 D
192,582,180
$0.28
$11
42
1961 P
76,668,244
$0.28
$23
43
1961 D
229,342,760
$0.28
$23
44
1962 P
110,602,019
$0.28
$11
45
1962 D
280,195,720
$0.28
$34
46
1963 P
178,851,645
$0.28
$11
47
1963 D
276,829,460
$0.28
$34
48
1964 P
1,028,622,762
$0.28
$9.13
49
1964 D
1,787,297,160
$0.28
$5.7
50
1965 P
136,131,380
$0.28
$5.7
51
1966 P
156,208,283
$0.28
$5.7
52
1967 P
107,325,800
$0.28
$5.7
53
1968 D
91,227,880
$0.28
$5.7
54
1968 S
100,396,004
$0.28
$5.7
55
1969 D
202,807,500
$0.28
$4.52
56
1969 S
123,099,631
$0
$2
57
1970 D
515,485,380
$0.28
$11
58
1970 S
241,464,814
$0.28
$9.13
59
1971 P
106,884,000
$0.85
$3.3
60
1971 D
316,144,800
$0.33
$3.3
61
1971 S
3,220,733
62
1971 S
200
63
1972 P
202,036,000
$0.28
$3.3
64
1972 D
351,694,600
$0.28
$3.3
65
1972 S
3,260,996
66
1973 P
384,396,000
$0.28
$3.3
67
1973 D
261,405,000
$0.28
$3.3
68
1973 S
2,760,339
69
1974 P
601,752,000
$0.28
$3.3
70
1974 D
277,373,000
$0.28
$3.3
71
1974 S
2,612,568
72
1975 P
181,772,000
$0.56
$3.3
73
1975 D
401,875,300
0$.28
$3.3
74
1975 S
2,845,450
75
1976 P
367,124,000
$0.5
$3.3
76
1976 D
563,964,147
$0.5
$3.3
77
1976 S
2,845,450
78
1977 P
585,376,000
$0.28
$3.3
79
1977 D
297,313,460
$0.56
$3.3
80
1977 S
3,251,152
81
1978 P
391,308,000
$0.28
$3.3
82
1978 D
313,092,780
$0.28
$3.3
83
1978 S
3,127,781
84
1979 P
463,188,000
$0.28
$3.3
85
1979 D
325,867,672
$0.28
$4.52
86
1979 S
3,677,175
87
1979 S
N/A
88
1979 S
N/A
89
1980 P
593,004,000
$0.28
$4.52
90
1980 D
502,323,448
$0.28
$3.3
91
1980 S
3,554,806
92
1981 P
657,504,000
$0.28
$3.3
93
1981 D
364,801,843
$0.28
$3.3
94
1981 S
4,063,083
95
1981 S
N/A
96
1981 S
N/A
97
1982 P
292,355,000
$5.7
$11
98
1982 D
373,726,544
$2.28
$6.65
99
1982 S
3,857,479
100
1983 P
561,615,000
$2.28
$10
101
1983 D
536,726,276
$1.71
$4.52
102
1983 S
3,279,126
103
1984 P
746,769,000
$1.13
$3.3
104
1984 D
517,675,146
$0.28
$3.3
105
1984 S
3,065,110
106
1985 P
647,114,962
$0.56
$3.3
107
1985 D
459,747,446
$0.56
$3.3
108
1985 S
3,362,821
109
1986 P
536,883,483
$0.56
$3.3
110
1986 D
361,819,140
$1.13
$3.06
111
1986 S
3,010,497
112
1987 P
371,499,481
$0.28
$3.06
113
1987 D
410,590,604
$0.28
$3.89
114
1987 S
4,227,728
115
1988 P
771,360,000
$0.28
$3.3
116
1988 D
663,771,652
$0.28
$3.3
117
1988 S
3,262,948
118
1989 P
898,812,000
$0.28
$3.06
119
1989 D
570,842,474
$0.28
$3.06
120
1989 S
3,220,194
121
1990 P
661,636,000
$0.28
$3.06
122
1990 D
663,938,503
$0.28
$3.06
123
1990 S
3,299,559
124
1991 P
614,104,000
$0.33
$3.06
125
1991 D
436,496,678
$0.33
$3.06
126
1991 S
2,867,787
127
1992 P
399,552,000
$1.71
$2.81
128
1992 D
450,565,113
$0.28
$1.13
129
1992 S
4,176,560
130
1993 P
412,076,000
$0.28
$1.13
131
1993 D
406,084,135
$0.28
$1.13
132
1993 S
3,394,792
133
1994 P
722,160,000
$0.28
$2.81
134
1994 P
167,703
$55
$83
135
1994 D
715,762,110
$0.28
$1.13
136
1994 S
3,269,923
137
1995 P
774,156,000
$0.28
$1.13
138
1995 D
888,112,000
$0.56
$1.13
139
1995 S
2,797,481
140
1996 P
829,332,000
$0.28
$1.13
141
1996 D
817,736,000
$0.28
$1.13
142
1996 S
2,525,625
143
1997 P
470,972,000
$0.56
$1.13
144
1997 P
25,000
$227
$285
145
1997 D
466,640,000
$1.13
$2.28
146
1997 S
2,796,678
147
1998 P
688,292,000
$0.39
$1.13
148
1998 D
635,380,000
$0.39
$1.13
149
1998 S
2,086,507
150
1999 P
1,212,000,000
$0.28
$1.13
151
1999 D
1,066,720,000
$0.28
$1.13
152
1999 S
3,347,966
153
2000 P
846,240,000
$0.28
$1.13
154
2000 D
1,509,220,000
$0.28
$1.13
155
2000 S
4,047,993
156
2001 P
675,704,000
$0.28
$1.13
157
2001 D
627,680,000
$0.28
$1.13
158
2001 S
3,184,606
159
2002 P
529,280,000
$0.28
$1.13
160
2002 D
691,200,000
$0.28
$1.13
161
2002 S
3,211,995
162
2003 P
441,840,000
$0.28
$1.13
163
2003 D
383,040,000
$0.28
$1.13
164
2003 S
3,298,439

Frequently Asked Questions

Where Is The Mint Mark On Jefferson Nickels?

The mint mark on Jefferson Nickels is located at the reverse of the coin, just beneath the “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The Jefferson Nickel is one of the rare coins to have the “P” mint mark at the reverse.

How To Grade Jefferson Nickels

Grading Jefferson Nickels is a pretty simple task for coin experts, however, if you are just starting out in the coin world, you might not be able to grade properly. Here is a video tutorial that shows you how to grade Jefferson Nickels like a pro.

What Is The Building On Reverse Side Of Jefferson Nickels

The reverse of the famous Jefferson Nickels in the Prewar and Wartime composition features the Monticello which was Jefferson’s home. However, special editions such as the Westward Journey Series have different designs on the reverse which are the Peace Medal, Keelboat, American Bison, and Ocean in view.

Last Words

If you have a Jefferson nickel and it has been in your family since day one, then you might be sitting on a real treasure. Before you sell the coin to any coin dealer, you should get a second opinion. Our guide gives you the value of various Jefferson Nickels. You might be able to sell the Jefferson Nickel for hundreds and hundreds of dollars online through auction sites or even eBay, or Amazon or Craigslist. We strongly recommend that you check all three. You never know what people will pay for items that are in limited supply.

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